Heart Disease

Critically ill patients who are not candidates for open heart surgery or would not survive transportation to another hospital often have few options when it comes to improving their quality of life. Overlook Medical Center is changing that notion with the introduction of the Impella® device. This mini heart pump provides the short-term support our cardiologists need to stabilize patients, so they can either be transferred for another surgery or allowed to achieve normal heart function on their own. The Impella procedure itself is minimally invasive and requires very little recovery time. Read more >



Heart Disease Programs and Screenings 

Education and prevention can keep you and your loved ones healthy. We invite you to take advantage of the programs, support groups and screenings available. Unless otherwise noted, to register for any of these programs call 1-800-247-9580 Monday through Thursday between 8:30am to 8:00pm and Friday between 8:30am and 4:30pm, or sign-up online at Atlantic Health System’s classes and events registration; all programs are free unless a fee is indicated.

Chambers Center for Well Being
The Chambers Center for Well Being can help you develop a personal plan for a healthier lifestyle. Through lectures, classes and therapeutic services, we’ll show you how stress management, proper dietary balance and increased exercise can improve your overall well-being – mind, body and spirit. View a full list of classes, services and related fees or call 908-598-7997.


Heart Disease Articles
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Noisy Neighborhood? Your Heart May Pay a Price

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 -- Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying, with new research suggesting it seems to raise the risk for serious heart problems.

Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed.

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'Yo-Yo' Cardio Readings May Signal Heart Risks

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 -- If your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol or blood sugar levels fluctuate, you may have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and premature death than people with more steady readings, new research suggests.

According to the study, during nearly six years of follow-up, men and women whose readings changed the most were 127 percent more likely to die, 43 percent more likely to have a heart attack and 41 percent more likely to have a stroke, compared with those whose readings remained stable.

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