Diabetes

When it comes to holiday eating, one of the biggest mistakes people make is skipping breakfast and lunch in prep for a big dinner. Although this may seem like a way to minimize calories throughout the day, this approach lends itself to overeating and ultimately putting on the pounds. Nutritionists instead recommend eating a hearty breakfast and lunch rich in fibers on the day of a holiday meal to control hunger. If you still find yourself craving second helpings at dinner, wait 10 to 20 minutes before actually filling your plate. This gives your brain time to recognize if you’re actually full.



Diabetes Programs and Screenings

Education and prevention can keep you and your loved ones healthy. We invite you to take advantage of the programs, support groups and screenings available. Unless otherwise noted, to register for any of these programs call 1-800-247-9580 Monday through Thursday between 8:30am to 8:00pm and Friday between 8:30am and 4:30pm or sign-up online at Atlantic Health

Taking Steps to Control Diabetes
This is a self-management education course designed to help patients and their families plan meals, monitor blood sugar, prevent complications and implement healthy lifestyle habits.  Individual and group classes are available and are covered by Medicare and most major insurers.
Overlook Medical Center
For a schedule and to register, please call 908-522-5277.


Chambers Center for Well Being
The Chambers Center for Well Being can help you develop a personal plan for a healthier lifestyle. Through lectures, classes and therapeutic services, we’ll show you how stress management, proper dietary balance and increased exercise can improve your overall well-being – mind, body and spirit. View a full list of classes, services and related fees or call 908-598-7997.


Diabetes Articles

Common Diabetes Meds May Raise Odds for Amputation

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 -- People with type 2 diabetes who are taking common drugs called diuretics may be at a significantly increased risk of losing a foot or leg, according to a new French study.

Researchers found that taking a diuretic raised the odds of having an amputation, or requiring an angioplasty or bypass, by 75 percent or more, compared with those not using the medicines.

Read more

Jump to Page :